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Ghanaian Army participates in dismount patrol training during Western Accord 14 exercise
Exercise Western Accord is a key element in a broader series of military-to-military activities to demonstrate the strong partnership between the U.S., United Nations, Netherlands, France and other regional African partners and participating militaries.
Sgt. 1st Class Douglas Friese, Alpha Co. platoon sergeant, 1st Bn. 28th Inf. Regt., 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div., watches over Burkina Faso soldiers as they practice search and seize techniques during a traffic control point exercise at Camp Thies, Senegal, June 17. This exercise is part of the Western Accord 14. (U.S. Army Africa photo by Sgt. Takita Lawery)
2 photos: United States Africa Command ImageBurkina Faso soldiers as they practice search and seize techniques
Photo 1 of 2: Sgt. 1st Class Douglas Friese, Alpha Co. platoon sergeant, 1st Bn. 28th Inf. Regt., 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div., watches over Burkina Faso soldiers as they practice search and seize techniques during a traffic control point exercise at Camp Thies, Senegal, June 17. This exercise is part of the Western Accord 14. (U.S. Army Africa photo by Sgt. Takita Lawery) Download full-resolution version
Pvt. Brett A. Dounoy and Spc. Mathew D. Minchin, both infantryman with Alpha Co., 1st Bn., 28th Inf. Regt., 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div., demonstrate search and seize techniques during a class given to the Burkina Faso Army soldiers at Camp Thies, Senegal, June 17. This training is part of Exercise Western Accord 14, which is dedicated to building a strong partnership with Economic Community of West African States and other partner nations. (U.S. Army Africa photo by Sgt. Takita Lawery)
2 photos: Soldiers demonstrate search and seize techniques
Photo 2 of 2: Pvt. Brett A. Dounoy and Spc. Mathew D. Minchin, both infantryman with Alpha Co., 1st Bn., 28th Inf. Regt., 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div., demonstrate search and seize techniques during a class given to the Burkina Faso Army soldiers at Camp Thies, Senegal, June 17. This training is part of Exercise Western Accord 14, which is dedicated to building a strong partnership with Economic Community of West African States and other partner nations. (U.S. Army Africa photo by Sgt. Takita Lawery) Download full-resolution version
Sgt. 1st Class Douglas Friese, Alpha Co. platoon sergeant, 1st Bn. 28th Inf. Regt., 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div., watches over Burkina Faso soldiers as they practice search and seize techniques during a traffic control point exercise at Camp Thies, Senegal, June 17. This exercise is part of the Western Accord 14. (U.S. Army Africa photo by Sgt. Takita Lawery)
Pvt. Brett A. Dounoy and Spc. Mathew D. Minchin, both infantryman with Alpha Co., 1st Bn., 28th Inf. Regt., 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div., demonstrate search and seize techniques during a class given to the Burkina Faso Army soldiers at Camp Thies, Senegal, June 17. This training is part of Exercise Western Accord 14, which is dedicated to building a strong partnership with Economic Community of West African States and other partner nations. (U.S. Army Africa photo by Sgt. Takita Lawery)

CAMP THIES, Senegal-- The U.S. Army hosted a dismount patrol training exercise for militaries from various nations as part of the Combined Joint Task Forces Western Accord 14 mission June 17-20.

Exercise Western Accord is a key element in a broader series of military-to-military activities to demonstrate the strong partnership between the U.S., United Nations, Netherlands, France and other regional African partners and participating militaries.

The Ghanaian Army was the first to partake in the dismount training exercise.

"This exercise is great because it is helping us to build relationships with the U.S. Army," said Cpl. Richard Aboah, engineer, Ghanaian Army.

Staff Sgt. Christopher Hines, infantryman, Company. A, 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, went over the basics of team, squad and platoon level combat formations.

"We're learning new formations like the wedge, which we call the arrowhead in our country, and line formations so we can use them as part of our military combat movements," Aboah explained.


The most difficult part for them was the hand and army signals, Hines said. 

"A lot of the movements were the same," Aboah said. "The only major differences were the hand and arm signals."

"They're catching-on pretty fast," Hines said. That's what makes this experience worth it. They're willing to learn and use what we teach them as part of their own tactics."

This exercise is one of many the U.S. military plan on using to help build a strong partnership with other regional West African nations.

"We enjoy working with friendly American Soldiers," Aboah said. "This training is fun and the relationship between us is very nice."

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