Contact Us Press Releases AFRICOM Portal
Malians Receive Medicine Through U.S. Medical Training Exercise
Boxes filled the small supply room-turned pharmacy as service members sorted through more than 30,000 pills destined for thousands of Malians July 15, 2008. <br /> <br />More than 90 doctors, nurses and medical technicians deployed to Mali for
BAMAKO, Mali -- Service members sort and label more than 40 medicines that will be distributed to thousands of Malians during MEDFLAG 08, July 14, 2008. More than 90 service members deployed to Bamako, Mali, for this multi-national medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African Forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michael S. Dorus)
2 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 1 of 2: BAMAKO, Mali -- Service members sort and label more than 40 medicines that will be distributed to thousands of Malians during MEDFLAG 08, July 14, 2008. More than 90 service members deployed to Bamako, Mali, for this multi-national medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African Forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michael S. Dorus) Download full-resolution version
BAMAKO, Mali - Major Altan Shaffer labels one of more than 40 medicines that will be distributed to thousands of Malians during MEDFLAG 08, July 14, 2008. More than 90 service members deployed to Bamako, Mali for this multi-national medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African Forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michael S. Dorus)
2 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 2 of 2: BAMAKO, Mali - Major Altan Shaffer labels one of more than 40 medicines that will be distributed to thousands of Malians during MEDFLAG 08, July 14, 2008. More than 90 service members deployed to Bamako, Mali for this multi-national medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African Forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michael S. Dorus) Download full-resolution version
BAMAKO, Mali -- Service members sort and label more than 40 medicines that will be distributed to thousands of Malians during MEDFLAG 08, July 14, 2008. More than 90 service members deployed to Bamako, Mali, for this multi-national medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African Forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michael S. Dorus)
BAMAKO, Mali - Major Altan Shaffer labels one of more than 40 medicines that will be distributed to thousands of Malians during MEDFLAG 08, July 14, 2008. More than 90 service members deployed to Bamako, Mali for this multi-national medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African Forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michael S. Dorus)
Boxes filled the small supply room-turned pharmacy as service members sorted through more than 30,000 pills destined for thousands of Malians July 15, 2008.

More than 90 doctors, nurses and medical technicians deployed to Mali for MEDFLAG 08, a multi-national medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African forces. As part of the exercise, participants will review medical procedures, exchange information, and administer medical and veterinary care to the local population.

For Master Sergeant Daniel McCain, the NCOIC of pharmacy services from Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, it's far from an average day in the pharmacy back home.

"Typically, we have a staff of 20 helping an average of 400 patients a day," said Sergeant McCain while sorting piles of multi-vitamins. "Here in Mali, I'm the only pharmacy technician working with medical volunteers to help process enough medication for at least 500 patients a day."

Various medical teams will visit four different Malian villages July 21-24, where they will treat patients for worms, stomach viruses, malaria and other common illnesses.

McCain and his team of volunteers have been sorting, labeling and standardizing more than 40 types of medication over the past three days for the medical teams to easily distribute.

"Our job is to support the physicians and give them whatever they need to treat their patients," he said. "We'll also be educating the Malians on the medicine they'll be taking with the help of pictorials and French translators."

According to the World Health Organization, Malians spend less than $60 a year per capita on medical care compared to the U.S., where $6,350 annually is the average.

"Knowing I've done something to help the Malians, who otherwise couldn't afford it, is huge," said McCain.
PARTNERSHIPS OPERATIONS READINESS