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U.S. Soldiers dust for prints with Djiboutian cadets
The Joint Theater Forensics Analysis Center (JTFAC) shared forensic practices with students at the Arta Interservices Military Academy (AMIA) during a class facilitated by U.S. Soldiers in Arta, Djibouti on May 27, 2014.
Joint Theater Forensics Analysis Center (JTFAC) members share forensic practices with students at the Arta Interservices Military Academy May 27, 2014, in Arta, Djibouti. The JTFAC instructors taught 12 cadets in attendance how to find, classify, identify, lift and handle fingerprints during the class facilitated by Bravo Company, 407th Civil Affairs Battalion.
1 photo: JTFAC members share forensic practices with students
Photo 1 of 1: Joint Theater Forensics Analysis Center (JTFAC) members share forensic practices with students at the Arta Interservices Military Academy May 27, 2014, in Arta, Djibouti. The JTFAC instructors taught 12 cadets in attendance how to find, classify, identify, lift and handle fingerprints during the class facilitated by Bravo Company, 407th Civil Affairs Battalion. Download full-resolution version

NOTE: This article was originally published on CJTF-HOA website on July 2.

 The Joint Theater Forensics Analysis Center (JTFAC) shared forensic practices with students at the Arta Interservices Military Academy (AMIA) during a class facilitated by Bravo Company, 407th Civil Affairs Battalion (CA BN) May 27, 2014 in Arta, Djibouti.

 “We have established a relationship with the academy and it has become very important to the embassy and to HOA (Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa),” said U.S. Army Capt. Bismarck Vergara, 407th CA BN team leader. “The academy is very eager to work with us.”

The JTFAC instructors taught 12 cadets in attendance how to find, classify, identify, lift and handle fingerprints.

“It’s important for them to know the basic handling of evidence,” said U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Bruce Gutierrez, JTFAC deputy director.

The cadets practiced dusting different surfaces for prints like plastic, glass and paper.

Students were also taught the importance of wearing gloves while working with fingerprints, explained Gutierrez, “There has been too many times where we have received evidence that has been cross-contaminated due to people handling it improperly.”

The students were also taught how to collect fingerprints from people both living and deceased. During this portion of the class a cadet would volunteer to act like a cadaver with rigamortis while the others would collect prints from the individual’s fingers.

The 407th CA BN facilitates classes with varying content at AMIA regularly. Other types of classes are English discussion and first aid.

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