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U.S. Service Members Complete Largest Medical Training Exercise in Africa
U.S. service members completed the largest annual humanitarian medical exercise in Africa July 26, 2008 following two-weeks of intense training and clinical visits in villages throughout Mali. <br /> <br />More than 90 service members deployed for
BAMAKO, Mali - Senior Airman Alicia Mangan, U.S. Air Force, takes the temperature of a young boy July 24, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. U.S. service members traveled to four villages administering treatment, as part of a multinational medical training exercise called MEDFLAG 08. In addition to treating thousands of patients, the medical team provided training for doctors, medics, and nurses and vaccinated livestock in the region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver)
3 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 1 of 3: BAMAKO, Mali - Senior Airman Alicia Mangan, U.S. Air Force, takes the temperature of a young boy July 24, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. U.S. service members traveled to four villages administering treatment, as part of a multinational medical training exercise called MEDFLAG 08. In addition to treating thousands of patients, the medical team provided training for doctors, medics, and nurses and vaccinated livestock in the region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver) Download full-resolution version
BAMAKO, Mali - Hundreds of Malians line up to be seen by American service members July 24, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. Throughout the medical training exercise, the U.S. medical team visited four villages, trained more than 160 doctors, medics and nurses, saw more than 4,000 patients, treated 4,100 goats and sheep, and conducted a mass casualty exercise in Mali. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver)
3 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 2 of 3: BAMAKO, Mali - Hundreds of Malians line up to be seen by American service members July 24, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. Throughout the medical training exercise, the U.S. medical team visited four villages, trained more than 160 doctors, medics and nurses, saw more than 4,000 patients, treated 4,100 goats and sheep, and conducted a mass casualty exercise in Mali. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver) Download full-resolution version
BAMAKO, Mali - Malian herders funnel sheep and goats into a corral to be seen by U.S. veterinarians July 21, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. More than 4,000 sheep were dewormed and vaccinated as part of a medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver)
3 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 3 of 3: BAMAKO, Mali - Malian herders funnel sheep and goats into a corral to be seen by U.S. veterinarians July 21, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. More than 4,000 sheep were dewormed and vaccinated as part of a medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver) Download full-resolution version
BAMAKO, Mali - Senior Airman Alicia Mangan, U.S. Air Force, takes the temperature of a young boy July 24, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. U.S. service members traveled to four villages administering treatment, as part of a multinational medical training exercise called MEDFLAG 08. In addition to treating thousands of patients, the medical team provided training for doctors, medics, and nurses and vaccinated livestock in the region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver)
BAMAKO, Mali - Hundreds of Malians line up to be seen by American service members July 24, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. Throughout the medical training exercise, the U.S. medical team visited four villages, trained more than 160 doctors, medics and nurses, saw more than 4,000 patients, treated 4,100 goats and sheep, and conducted a mass casualty exercise in Mali. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver)
BAMAKO, Mali - Malian herders funnel sheep and goats into a corral to be seen by U.S. veterinarians July 21, 2008 in a village outside of Bamako, Mali. More than 4,000 sheep were dewormed and vaccinated as part of a medical training exercise designed to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justin Weaver)
U.S. service members completed the largest annual humanitarian medical exercise in Africa July 26, 2008 following two-weeks of intense training and clinical visits in villages throughout Mali.

More than 90 service members deployed for the multinational medical training exercise, MEDFLAG 08, to enhance medical capabilities and readiness for U.S. and African forces.

As part of the exercise, medical teams visited four villages, trained more than 160 doctors, medics and nurses, saw more than 4,000 patients, extracted approximately 600 teeth, treated 4,100 goats and sheep, and conducted a mass casualty exercise in Mali.

"We exceeded all expectations we had for this exercise and humanitarian mission," said Lieutenant Colonel Troy McGilvra, MEDFLAG 08 commander. "I couldn't have asked for a better team to have worked with."

Throughout the exercise, the medical team focused their efforts in three phases. The first phase consisted of medical training with Mali medics in a variety of subject areas including emergency medicine, triage, stabilization, evacuation and disaster preparedness training.

During the second phase, Mali medics practiced disaster response services in a mass casualty scenario. Using medical make-up and latex injury reproductions, realistic casualties were simulated to test the Malian's medical response personnel.

In the third phase, Malian and U.S. medics provided a wide range of on-site medical services to local communities including basic medical evaluation and treatment, preventive medicine treatment, dental screenings and treatment, optometry screenings, eyewear distribution and public health training. Additionally, Army veterinarians vaccinated and dewormed livestock in the surrounding villages.

McGilvra said he'd never forget this exercise, particularly the moment when a woman in line went into labor and delivered a baby girl. In a gesture of gratitude, she asked McGilvra to name the baby.

"I named the baby Shelly, after my wife," McGilvra said. "It was overwhelming to have such a great honor given to me."

The American medics consisted of an array of medical specialties from bases in Europe and the United States including surgeons, nurses, physicians, dentists, optometrists and public health staff.
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