Uganda, US Come Together For Animal Education

KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 6 2011) - Army Specialist Shawn England assists a local farmer with a goat vaccination near Kaabong, Uganda, September 6. Specialist England was part of a two-member U.S. Army team sent to Kaabong to partner with local community animal health workers. As the team's veterinary technician, Specialist England was responsible for the distribution of much-needed vaccines and medicines, as well as assisting with vaccination and treatment of small animals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson) U.S. AFRICOM Photo KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 6 2011) - Army Specialist Shawn England assists a local farmer with a goat vaccination near Kaabong, Uganda, September 6. Specialist England was part of a two-member U.S. Army team sent to Kaabong to partner with local community animal health workers. As the team's veterinary technician, Specialist England was responsible for the distribution of much-needed vaccines and medicines, as well as assisting with vaccination and treatment of small animals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson)
KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 7 2011) - Ilukal Gabriel, a Kaabong-area community animal health worker, vaccinates a goat while farmers assist in a field treatment exercise near Kaabong, Uganda, September 7. Local farmers traveled to a site just outside Kaabong to have their animals vaccinated at no cost to them. Thirty community animal health workers spend eight hours a day vaccinating and treating thousands of cows, sheep, goats, donkeys, dogs and cats at three different treatment sites. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson) U.S. AFRICOM Photo KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 7 2011) - Ilukal Gabriel, a Kaabong-area community animal health worker, vaccinates a goat while farmers assist in a field treatment exercise near Kaabong, Uganda, September 7. Local farmers traveled to a site just outside Kaabong to have their animals vaccinated at no cost to them. Thirty community animal health workers spend eight hours a day vaccinating and treating thousands of cows, sheep, goats, donkeys, dogs and cats at three different treatment sites. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson)
KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 9 2011) - United States Army Major Dean Klenz shows local community animal health workers the process of closed castration on a bull near Kaabong, Uganda, September 9. In addition to vaccinations and disease treatment, community animal health workers in the area neutered bulls to prevent diseases caused by cattle inbreeding. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson) U.S. AFRICOM Photo KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 9 2011) - United States Army Major Dean Klenz shows local community animal health workers the process of closed castration on a bull near Kaabong, Uganda, September 9. In addition to vaccinations and disease treatment, community animal health workers in the area neutered bulls to prevent diseases caused by cattle inbreeding. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson)
KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 7 2011) - Community animal health workers Lokoru Sarah (left) and Longole Simon Peter give an oral vaccination to a donkey near Kaabong, Uganda September 7. Over the course of five days, 52 donkeys were vaccinated and treated for various diseases to help the local population maintain healthy livestock. Animals were given vaccinations for common diseases in the region, as well as multivitamins. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson) U.S. AFRICOM Photo KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 7 2011) - Community animal health workers Lokoru Sarah (left) and Longole Simon Peter give an oral vaccination to a donkey near Kaabong, Uganda September 7. Over the course of five days, 52 donkeys were vaccinated and treated for various diseases to help the local population maintain healthy livestock. Animals were given vaccinations for common diseases in the region, as well as multivitamins. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson)
KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 5 2011) - Ikulal Gabriel, a Kaabong-area community animal health worker, vaccinates cattle as they walk through a livestock chute near Kaabong, Uganda, September 5. The chute was used to provide an opportunity to treat, spray and vaccinate multiple cattle at one time. More than 20,000 cattle were treated in a five-day veterinary civil action program at three different sites throughout the Kaabong area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson) U.S. AFRICOM Photo KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 5 2011) - Ikulal Gabriel, a Kaabong-area community animal health worker, vaccinates cattle as they walk through a livestock chute near Kaabong, Uganda, September 5. The chute was used to provide an opportunity to treat, spray and vaccinate multiple cattle at one time. More than 20,000 cattle were treated in a five-day veterinary civil action program at three different sites throughout the Kaabong area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson)
KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 6 2011) - Lokoru Sarah, a Kaabong community animal health worker, assists Longole Simon Peter with the vaccination of a baby chicken near Kaabong, Uganda, September 6.  Thirty community animal health workers participated in a two-week veterinary civil action program (VetCAP) sponsored by the Uganda People's Defense Force, the Uganda Ministry for Livestock, Agriculture and Fisheries, and Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. More than 29,500 animals were treated during the VETCAP, including cows, sheep, goats, chickens, donkeys, dogs and cats. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson) U.S. AFRICOM Photo KAABONG, Uganda (Sep 6 2011) - Lokoru Sarah, a Kaabong community animal health worker, assists Longole Simon Peter with the vaccination of a baby chicken near Kaabong, Uganda, September 6. Thirty community animal health workers participated in a two-week veterinary civil action program (VetCAP) sponsored by the Uganda People's Defense Force, the Uganda Ministry for Livestock, Agriculture and Fisheries, and Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. More than 29,500 animals were treated during the VETCAP, including cows, sheep, goats, chickens, donkeys, dogs and cats. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaitlyn Johnson)
Thirty Community Animal Health Workers from Kaabong, Uganda, participated in a two-week veterinary civil action program to gain knowledge and skills in livestock treatment and sustainment. The program was a joint effort between the Uganda People's Defense Force, the Ugandan Ministry for Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries and the Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa.

Soldiers from the 490th Civil Affairs Battalion Functional Specialty Team (FxSP), assigned to Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa, traveled to Kaabong, August 29 to September 9, to bring veterinary assistance to the northern region of the country.

"The Karamoja region has a shortage of veterinarians, so they rely heavily on community animal health workers," said U.S. Army Major Dean Klenz, the VETCAP mission commander. Klenz added that having a plentiful number of CAHWs who are up-to-date on providing treatments is vital to farmers since animal diseases can often be transmitted to humans.

The CAHWs spent one week in a classroom environment, discussing how to detect diseases and apply preventative measures to cattle, goats, sheep, donkeys, dogs and cats.

"This emphasizes how important their livestock is, what diseases that humans can catch from them, and how healthy animals and livestock will lead to healthier people," said U.S. Army Specialist Shawn England, 490th FxSP veterinary technician.

Afterwards, the CAHWs, along with the FxSP team and four veterinary students from Makerere University in Kampala, traveled to three treatment sites in and around Kaabong to provide free treatments for livestock owners. Makerere students and the CAHWs took on the responsibility of being the primary treatment givers in the field.

"The students were very knowledgeable which made it easy to teach them and were equally eager to learn new things," said Mbatidole Irene, a Makerere graduate. "When it came to the field work, they were very cooperative and hard working, thus we managed to treat many animals."

A total of 29,502 animals were treated in the one-week field VETCAP period, with the majority of those animals - more than 25,000 - being cattle brought by local owners.

With the assistance of both the Ugandan and American veterinary representatives, the CAHWs completed the mission with spray pumps, medicinal drenching guns and coolers. Their work enables future assistance to animal owners and farmers to continue inoculations for animals to remain healthy.
U.S. Army