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LUSAKA, Zambia -- U.S. Africa Command's civilian deputy, Ambassador Mary Carlin Yates, greets staff at a new U.S.-funded HIV/AIDS State Lodge clinic for Zambian security police and their families in the outskirts of Lusaka, Zambia, on February 25, 2008. U.S. military funding contributed to the building of the clinic because Zambia's police have played a major role in peacekeeping deployments. The United States plans to formally turn the clinic over to the Zambian government in the near future. U.S. Embassy staff in Zambia said the Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) clinic is an example of the kind of innovative interagency projects being encouraged by the creation of U.S. Africa command; the clinic's building was funded by the U.S. Department of Defense while the equipment and training is being funded by the U.S. Center for Disease Control. The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) contributes more than $250 million to Zambia to combat HIV/AIDs, which infects about 17 percent of the population. The U.S. military administers only a small percentage of PEPFAR funds -- about $8 million in Zambia -- concentrating on military-to-military programs. In many countries, soldiers and peacekeepers have higher infection rates than the civilian population because they are young, stationed away from home, receive regular pay and interact with local populations.
LUSAKA, Zambia -- U.S. Africa Command's civilian deputy, Ambassador Mary Carlin Yates, greets staff at a new U.S.-funded HIV/AIDS State Lodge clinic for Zambian security police and their families in the outskirts of Lusaka, Zambia, on February 25, 2008. U.S. military funding contributed to the building of the clinic because Zambia's police have played a major role in peacekeeping deployments. The United States plans to formally turn the clinic over to the Zambian government in the near future. U.S. Embassy staff in Zambia said the Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) clinic is an example of the kind of innovative interagency projects being encouraged by the creation of U.S. Africa command; the clinic's building was funded by the U.S. Department of Defense while the equipment and training is being funded by the U.S. Center for Disease Control. The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) contributes more than $250 million to Zambia to combat HIV/AIDs, which infects about 17 percent of the population. The U.S. military administers only a small percentage of PEPFAR funds -- about $8 million in Zambia -- concentrating on military-to-military programs. In many countries, soldiers and peacekeepers have higher infection rates than the civilian population because they are young, stationed away from home, receive regular pay and interact with local populations.
LUSAKA, Zambia -- U.S. Africa Command's civilian deputy, Ambassador Mary Carlin Yates, greets staff at a new U.S.-funded HIV/AIDS State Lodge clinic for Zambian security police and their families in the outskirts of Lusaka, Zambia, on February 25, 2008. U.S. military funding contributed to the building of the clinic because Zambia's police have played a major role in peacekeeping deployments. The United States plans to formally turn the clinic over to the Zambian government in the near future. U.S. Embassy staff in Zambia said the Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) clinic is an example of the kind of innovative interagency projects being encouraged by the creation of U.S. Africa command; the clinic's building was funded by the U.S. Department of Defense while the equipment and training is being funded by the U.S. Center for Disease Control. The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) contributes more than $250 million to Zambia to combat HIV/AIDs, which infects about 17 percent of the population. The U.S. military administers only a small percentage of PEPFAR funds -- about $8 million in Zambia -- concentrating on military-to-military programs. In many countries, soldiers and peacekeepers have higher infection rates than the civilian population because they are young, stationed away from home, receive regular pay and interact with local populations.
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