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Nashville, with Multinational Staff, Kicks Off APS Mission with Port Visit in Senegal
USS Nashville (LPD 13), along with its embarked Destroyer Squadron 60 and multinational staff, arrived in Dakar, Senegal, February 3, 2009, for the in-country kickoff of Africa Partnership Station (APS) Nashville. <br /> <br />The second
USS NASHVILLE, At Sea -  A Search and Rescue (SAR) team re-boards USS Nashville (LPD 13) after recovering "Smiegel," a simulated body, during a man-overboard drill, January 2, 2009. Nashville, en route to Dakar, Senegal, is participating in APS, an international initiative developed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Naval Forces Africa, which aims to work cooperatively with U.S. and international partners to improve maritime safety and security in West and Central Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Bookwalter)
2 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 1 of 2: USS NASHVILLE, At Sea - A Search and Rescue (SAR) team re-boards USS Nashville (LPD 13) after recovering "Smiegel," a simulated body, during a man-overboard drill, January 2, 2009. Nashville, en route to Dakar, Senegal, is participating in APS, an international initiative developed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Naval Forces Africa, which aims to work cooperatively with U.S. and international partners to improve maritime safety and security in West and Central Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Bookwalter) Download full-resolution version
USS NASHVILLE, At Sea -  Petty Officer 3rd Class Juan Garza finishes a mural for Africa Partnership Station (APS) Nashville on the hangar bay of USS Nashville (LPD 13), February 2, 2009. Nashville, en route to Dakar, Senegal, is participating in APS, an international initiative developed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Naval Forces Africa, which aims to work cooperatively with U.S. and international partners to improve maritime safety and security in West and Central Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Bookwalter)
2 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 2 of 2: USS NASHVILLE, At Sea - Petty Officer 3rd Class Juan Garza finishes a mural for Africa Partnership Station (APS) Nashville on the hangar bay of USS Nashville (LPD 13), February 2, 2009. Nashville, en route to Dakar, Senegal, is participating in APS, an international initiative developed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Naval Forces Africa, which aims to work cooperatively with U.S. and international partners to improve maritime safety and security in West and Central Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Bookwalter) Download full-resolution version
USS NASHVILLE, At Sea -  A Search and Rescue (SAR) team re-boards USS Nashville (LPD 13) after recovering "Smiegel," a simulated body, during a man-overboard drill, January 2, 2009. Nashville, en route to Dakar, Senegal, is participating in APS, an international initiative developed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Naval Forces Africa, which aims to work cooperatively with U.S. and international partners to improve maritime safety and security in West and Central Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Bookwalter)
USS NASHVILLE, At Sea -  Petty Officer 3rd Class Juan Garza finishes a mural for Africa Partnership Station (APS) Nashville on the hangar bay of USS Nashville (LPD 13), February 2, 2009. Nashville, en route to Dakar, Senegal, is participating in APS, an international initiative developed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Naval Forces Africa, which aims to work cooperatively with U.S. and international partners to improve maritime safety and security in West and Central Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Bookwalter)
USS Nashville (LPD 13), along with its embarked Destroyer Squadron 60 and multinational staff, arrived in Dakar, Senegal, February 3, 2009, for the in-country kickoff of Africa Partnership Station (APS) Nashville.

The second deployment of its kind, APS Nashville has brought together an international team of experts in a variety of military capacities as well as a handful of civilian fields such as fisheries management and environmental stewardship.

"This initiative has been built at the request of African partners, and we will execute it side-by-side with an embarked team of officers and civilian specialists from 20 different countries," says Captain Cindy Thebaud, APS Nashville commander. "This fact should send a clear message. The responsibility of maritime security truly is a global effort."

The integration of international officers with the Nashville crew plays a big part in accomplishing the APS Nashville mission, Commanding Officer Captain Tushar Tembe said.

"When you look throughout our ship, you now see a diverse staff of naval officers all wearing the different uniforms of their countries," Tembe said. "Africa Partnership Station has brought us all together to work a unified efforttâ?at the end of the workday; we are all just maritime professionals, all sailors working side-by-side. It's a tremendous example for my crew."

APS training in Senegal will also include professional exchanges on seamanship and maritime awareness. Those training sessions, specifically tailored to requests made by Senegalese officials, are among the most important parts of the port stop, said Senegalese Navy Lieutenant Jean Pierre Tine, a member of APS international staff.

"We are very happy to participate in this great institute for all the African partners," Tine said. "We were given the opportunity to select the courses, so what we are doing here is definitely going to help Senegal. The training will help our people to be more skillful in what they do and more aware of what is happening around the world."

While in Senegal, sailors will have the opportunity to participate in several community relations (COMREL) projects, including work on a medical clinic and several Project Handclasp initiatives.

"I think we have been given a great opportunity to help in Senegal wherever we are needed," said Petty Officer 1st Class Albert Miller. "For some of us, taking part in the COMRELs means a lot. You should always take advantage of the chance to help others, and we know that we can really make a difference."

APS Nashville is an international initiative developed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Naval Forces Africa that aims to enhance maritime safety and security in West and Central Africa.

In addition to Senegal, the APS team will make port calls in four other West African countries, including Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon and Gabon.
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