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African Civilian and Military Representatives Tackle Drug Trafficking Issues
The issue of narcotics trafficking brought 21 African senior military officers and civilian executives to a 10-day seminar at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany to discuss how to address
GARMISCH, Germany - U.S. Africa Command's Deputy to the Commander for Civil- Military Activities, Ambassador J. Anthony Holmes, addresses 91 participants from 61 countries, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany. Holmes was the final speaker to close out a 10-day senior executive seminar focused on the regional and global impact of illegal narcotics trafficking. Addressing the participants, 21 of whom were from Africa, Holmes talked a bit about how AFRICOM was different from the other commands. "Other commands tended to focus on military planning and military responses to national security threats.  We were able to create a command that was more appropriate for the realities in Africa and more responsive to our own experiences," said Holmes.(Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center)
5 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 1 of 5: GARMISCH, Germany - U.S. Africa Command's Deputy to the Commander for Civil- Military Activities, Ambassador J. Anthony Holmes, addresses 91 participants from 61 countries, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany. Holmes was the final speaker to close out a 10-day senior executive seminar focused on the regional and global impact of illegal narcotics trafficking. Addressing the participants, 21 of whom were from Africa, Holmes talked a bit about how AFRICOM was different from the other commands. "Other commands tended to focus on military planning and military responses to national security threats. We were able to create a command that was more appropriate for the realities in Africa and more responsive to our own experiences," said Holmes.(Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center) Download full-resolution version
GARMISCH, Germany - African participants of the Senior Executive Seminar 10-1 at the George C.Marshall European Center for Security Studies talk with General William "Kip" Ward, commander of U.S. Africa Command, January 20, 2010, during a social event. Ward provided opening remarks at the start of a nine-day counter-narcotics seminar, which was co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM). (Photo by Karlheinz Wedhorn)
5 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 2 of 5: GARMISCH, Germany - African participants of the Senior Executive Seminar 10-1 at the George C.Marshall European Center for Security Studies talk with General William "Kip" Ward, commander of U.S. Africa Command, January 20, 2010, during a social event. Ward provided opening remarks at the start of a nine-day counter-narcotics seminar, which was co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM). (Photo by Karlheinz Wedhorn) Download full-resolution version
GARMISCH, Germany - A military representative from Burkina Faso applauds following a presentation at a 10-day senior executive seminar on counter-narcotics, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany.  More than 91 civilian and military representatives from 61 countries around the world attended the event, which was co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM). (Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center)
5 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 3 of 5: GARMISCH, Germany - A military representative from Burkina Faso applauds following a presentation at a 10-day senior executive seminar on counter-narcotics, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany. More than 91 civilian and military representatives from 61 countries around the world attended the event, which was co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM). (Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center) Download full-resolution version
GARMISCH, Germany - General William E. Ward, commander of U.S. Africa Command, speaks to nearly 100 distinguished participants representing 66 nations from around the world at the start of a nine-day counter-narcotics seminar, January 20, 2010, in Garmisch, Germany. The forum, co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM), was hosted by the George C. Marshall Center's College of International and Security Studies, as part of its Senior Executive Seminar
5 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 4 of 5: GARMISCH, Germany - General William E. Ward, commander of U.S. Africa Command, speaks to nearly 100 distinguished participants representing 66 nations from around the world at the start of a nine-day counter-narcotics seminar, January 20, 2010, in Garmisch, Germany. The forum, co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM), was hosted by the George C. Marshall Center's College of International and Security Studies, as part of its Senior Executive Seminar Download full-resolution version
GARMISCH, Germany - U.S. Africa Command's Deputy to the Commander for Civil- Military Activities, Ambassador J. Anthony Holmes, addresses 91 participants from 61 countries, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany. Holmes was the final speaker to close out a 10-day senior executive seminar focused on the regional and global impact of illegal narcotics trafficking. In his comments, Holmes said that in previous years, the United States viewed  Africa as a place for our humanitarian responses. But, he said, "That is not the case today. Africa is very much at the center of U.S. foreign policy."(Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center)
5 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 5 of 5: GARMISCH, Germany - U.S. Africa Command's Deputy to the Commander for Civil- Military Activities, Ambassador J. Anthony Holmes, addresses 91 participants from 61 countries, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany. Holmes was the final speaker to close out a 10-day senior executive seminar focused on the regional and global impact of illegal narcotics trafficking. In his comments, Holmes said that in previous years, the United States viewed Africa as a place for our humanitarian responses. But, he said, "That is not the case today. Africa is very much at the center of U.S. foreign policy."(Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center) Download full-resolution version
GARMISCH, Germany - U.S. Africa Command's Deputy to the Commander for Civil- Military Activities, Ambassador J. Anthony Holmes, addresses 91 participants from 61 countries, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany. Holmes was the final speaker to close out a 10-day senior executive seminar focused on the regional and global impact of illegal narcotics trafficking. Addressing the participants, 21 of whom were from Africa, Holmes talked a bit about how AFRICOM was different from the other commands. "Other commands tended to focus on military planning and military responses to national security threats.  We were able to create a command that was more appropriate for the realities in Africa and more responsive to our own experiences," said Holmes.(Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center)
GARMISCH, Germany - African participants of the Senior Executive Seminar 10-1 at the George C.Marshall European Center for Security Studies talk with General William "Kip" Ward, commander of U.S. Africa Command, January 20, 2010, during a social event. Ward provided opening remarks at the start of a nine-day counter-narcotics seminar, which was co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM). (Photo by Karlheinz Wedhorn)
GARMISCH, Germany - A military representative from Burkina Faso applauds following a presentation at a 10-day senior executive seminar on counter-narcotics, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany.  More than 91 civilian and military representatives from 61 countries around the world attended the event, which was co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM). (Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center)
GARMISCH, Germany - General William E. Ward, commander of U.S. Africa Command, speaks to nearly 100 distinguished participants representing 66 nations from around the world at the start of a nine-day counter-narcotics seminar, January 20, 2010, in Garmisch, Germany. The forum, co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM), was hosted by the George C. Marshall Center's College of International and Security Studies, as part of its Senior Executive Seminar
GARMISCH, Germany - U.S. Africa Command's Deputy to the Commander for Civil- Military Activities, Ambassador J. Anthony Holmes, addresses 91 participants from 61 countries, January 28, 2010, at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany. Holmes was the final speaker to close out a 10-day senior executive seminar focused on the regional and global impact of illegal narcotics trafficking. In his comments, Holmes said that in previous years, the United States viewed  Africa as a place for our humanitarian responses. But, he said, "That is not the case today. Africa is very much at the center of U.S. foreign policy."(Photo courtesy of George C. Marshall Center)
The issue of narcotics trafficking brought 21 African senior military officers and civilian executives to a 10-day seminar at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany to discuss how to address the challenge.

Nearly 100 counter-narcotics experts from 61 countries participated in the George C. Marshall Center's Senior Executive Seminar 10-1, January 20-29, 2010, which focused on the complex security challenges posed by contemporary international narcotics trafficking and its links with terrorist networks and organized crime elements. The seminar participants examined how narcotics profits are used to fund terrorist activities, corrupt officials, and challenge and erode the authority of states.The forum was co-sponsored by U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and U.S. European Command (EUCOM).

Among the 91 participants were 21 Africans from Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Gabon., Gambia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tomé and Príncipe, Senegal, Swaziland, the Togolese Republic, and Uganda. In addition to English, German and Russian languages, this was the first time the Marshall Center provided French translation for the seminar.

A dozen speakers from a cross section of military and civilian disciplines, including Army General "Kip" Ward, commander of U.S. Africa Command, gave presentations to the group. Ambassador J. Anthony Holmes, deputy to the commander for civil-military activities for U.S. Africa Command, served as the graduation keynote speaker.

Holmes, whose background includes more than 15 years of experience in Africa and policy issues on Africa as a State Department employee, emphasized partnership and working together to address drug trafficking issues.

"The problem itself is regional. It is inherently multilateral," he said. "There's no such thing as a transit country. There's no such thing as a producing country. Virtually all countries are producing, transit and consuming countries."

Holmes also emphasized the importance of looking at the "long term investment in dealing with underlying issues related to regional security." He said, "The challenges in Africa are long term challenges."

He also acknowledged that the challenges cannot be overcome by applying a purely military solution. "We increasingly realized that what we needed to address the problem was an interagency approach," Holmes said.

The Marshall Center's Senior Executive Seminar is a forum that allows for the in-depth exploration of international security issues. Participants include high-level government officials, general officers, senior diplomats, ambassadors, ministers, and parliamentarians. The SES format includes presentations by senior officials and recognized experts followed by discussions in seminar groups.

"In today's globalized environment, counter-narcotics programs create intricate interdependencies within the international community which must be managed on numerous levels," said Dr. Jay Le Beau, director of the Senior Executive Seminar. "As a result, there will also be discussion on various regional approaches that have been implemented to combat this problem."

The 2010 Senior Executive Seminars concentrate on the broad topics of narcotics trafficking and terrorism, and their impact on security in Europe and beyond. By considering these issues as different aspects of the broader theme of international security, the complex interdependencies in international and networked security can be more easily understood.
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