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Tropical medicine topic for Djiboutian, French and US professionals during CJTF-HOA event
Military medical personnel share knowledge and experiences about diseases common to the Horn of Africa in three-day event hosted by the U.S. Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa.
Medical professionals from U.S., French and Djiboutian armed forces gathered for a Military Tropical Medicine Course at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Oct. 20 to 22, 2015. The course was an exchange of knowledge and experience about diseases common to the Horn of Africa and around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victoria Sneed/Released)
1 photo: Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa Image
Photo 1 of 1: Medical professionals from U.S., French and Djiboutian armed forces gathered for a Military Tropical Medicine Course at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Oct. 20 to 22, 2015. The course was an exchange of knowledge and experience about diseases common to the Horn of Africa and around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victoria Sneed/Released) Download full-resolution version

CAMP Lemonnier, Djibouti - Medical professionals from the U.S., Djiboutian and French armed services gathered recently at Camp Lemonnier for a Military Tropical Medicine program, the first of its kind hosted by CJTF-HOA.

The three day event enabled attendees to exchange knowledge and share experiences about diseases common to the Horn of Africa and featured discussions on the most deadly epidemics around the world.

“It’s ideal to learn together,” said U.S. Navy Capt. David Blazes, Military Tropical Medicine Course program director, Uniformed Services University, Naval Support Activity Bethesda, Maryland.  “We impart our knowledge and they share their experiences. It’s a good way to build bridges across cultures.”

The course covered a host of topics to include medical ethics, diseases, diagnosis techniques and pest induced infections.

“We learned many more protocols to treat common diseases,” said Gueh Mohamed, a doctor who serves with the Djibouti Armed Forces. “We also heard what new vaccines are available.”

“I learned how they diagnose and treat diseases,” said Blazes. ”They are generally challenged by lack of diagnostic resources, but are still able to provide great care.”

“We are taught in a French medical school,” said Gueh. “They teach differently than in the U.S.”

Differences in training allowed for new thought processes and ideas to be exchanged by participants, specifically regarding diseases common in Eastern African countries.

“We have some basic knowledge of these diseases,” said Blazes, "and they have the experience of actually treating them.”

The forum provided a rare opportunity to exchange of information between partners in hopes they can learn to treat diseases that are not common to the area and may appear due to advances in travel.

“Worldwide travel has increased the transmission of disease,” said Blazes. “It is easy to get on a plane and not show any symptoms or be an unknowing carrier.”

With troops moving in and out of the region, the U.S. shares a common concern to keep diseases at bay.

“We all share an interest with the Djiboutians to control these diseases,” said Blazes. “This course is a perfect forum to share best practices from both sides.”

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