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Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office Conduct Hydrographic Survey of Maputo Bay.
The U.S. Navy scientific survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen, named after a world-famous American oceanographic surveyor, pulled into the Port of Maputo on June 20, 2011, after a 30-day period in which the crew, in partnership with the Mozambique
MAPUTO, Mozambique - A line handler at the Port of Maputo secures a mooring line from the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64) when the ship pulled in after a 30 day period in which it hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches, June 20, 2011. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel and its approaches. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley)
3 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 1 of 3: MAPUTO, Mozambique - A line handler at the Port of Maputo secures a mooring line from the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64) when the ship pulled in after a 30 day period in which it hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches, June 20, 2011. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel and its approaches. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley) Download full-resolution version
MAPUTO, Mozambique - Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique Fuzileiros (similar to a U.S. Marine) Private Armondo Utui checks his weapon after a security brief held on the pier of the Port of Maputo where the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64) pulled in after a 30-day period when its crew hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches, June 20, 2011. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel. Fuzileiros provided 24-hour security for the Bruce Hezeen for its four-day port visit. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley)
3 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 2 of 3: MAPUTO, Mozambique - Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique Fuzileiros (similar to a U.S. Marine) Private Armondo Utui checks his weapon after a security brief held on the pier of the Port of Maputo where the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64) pulled in after a 30-day period when its crew hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches, June 20, 2011. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel. Fuzileiros provided 24-hour security for the Bruce Hezeen for its four-day port visit. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley) Download full-resolution version
MAPUTO, Mozambique - Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique Captitao Tenente Monjane talks to the NCIS agent responsible for security at the Port of Maputo during a brief with Fuzileiros (similar to U.S. Marines) prior to the arrival of the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64), June 29, 2011. During a 30-day period, the crew hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel. Fuzileiros provided 24-hour security for the Bruce Hezeen for its four-day port visit. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley)
3 photos: U.S. AFRICOM Photo
Photo 3 of 3: MAPUTO, Mozambique - Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique Captitao Tenente Monjane talks to the NCIS agent responsible for security at the Port of Maputo during a brief with Fuzileiros (similar to U.S. Marines) prior to the arrival of the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64), June 29, 2011. During a 30-day period, the crew hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel. Fuzileiros provided 24-hour security for the Bruce Hezeen for its four-day port visit. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley) Download full-resolution version
MAPUTO, Mozambique - A line handler at the Port of Maputo secures a mooring line from the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64) when the ship pulled in after a 30 day period in which it hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches, June 20, 2011. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel and its approaches. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley)
MAPUTO, Mozambique - Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique Fuzileiros (similar to a U.S. Marine) Private Armondo Utui checks his weapon after a security brief held on the pier of the Port of Maputo where the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64) pulled in after a 30-day period when its crew hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches, June 20, 2011. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel. Fuzileiros provided 24-hour security for the Bruce Hezeen for its four-day port visit. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley)
MAPUTO, Mozambique - Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique Captitao Tenente Monjane talks to the NCIS agent responsible for security at the Port of Maputo during a brief with Fuzileiros (similar to U.S. Marines) prior to the arrival of the survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen (T-AGS-64), June 29, 2011. During a 30-day period, the crew hydrographed 5,276 nautical miles of the Bay of Maputooâ€s channel and its approaches. The hydrographing mission is a four-month, multi-national venture between the Marinha de Guerra de Mozambique and the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office to complete a survey of the Maputo Bayyâ€s channel. Fuzileiros provided 24-hour security for the Bruce Hezeen for its four-day port visit. (U.S. AFRICOM photo by Petty Officer Steve Owsley)
The U.S. Navy scientific survey ship USNS Bruce Heezen, named after a world-famous American oceanographic surveyor, pulled into the Port of Maputo on June 20, 2011, after a 30-day period in which the crew, in partnership with the Mozambique military, conducted hydrographic surveys of Maputo Bay's channel and approaches.

The ship and its complement of two Hydrographic Survey Launch boats scanned 5,276 nautical miles of the ocean floor.

The team is conducting what is called a first order survey, which requires that the entire area of the survey be scanned with a multi-beam sonar array, said the ship's senior Naval Oceanographic Office representative, Kenzie Delaine. The survey data will be shared with the Mozambican government's Ministry of Transportation and Communication and Ministry of Defense, providing usable, current navigational data to increase safety of navigation, which will benefit commerce, tourism, and future ship visits to Maputo Bay.

Commercial activities in shallow water ports, such as Maputo's, are made significantly safer and more attractive with more detailed information about depths and safest transit areas, leading to greater trade opportunities, as well as facilitating anti-piracy exercises involving larger ships.

Two Mozambican Navy officers were on the ship during the period at sea, serving as liaisons aboard the survey boats during survey operations, and participating in the data collection and processing on board the HEEZEN.

"They were great team players. They were in the launches everyday, working with the surveyors and the boat crews. Without them approximately 60 percent of our mission wouldn't happen," said Ship Master Ryan White.

The Mozambican Navy has also been providing security escorts for the HSLs during the surveys, utilizing two of the twelve 7 meter rigid hull boats recently supplied to them by the U.S. government as part of a U.S. Africa Command maritime security program.

The two embarked officers and their counterparts on the security boats ensured that any vessels in the area maintained a safe distance from the HSL survey vessels during their operation. The Mozambican Navy officers speak both English and Portuguese, helping to communicate orders from the survey launches to the security teams and communicating with other vessels in the area that could have interfered with their surveys.

Mozambican Fuzileiros, similar to U.S. Marines, are also providing physical security on the pier 24 hours a day while the ship is in port.

This is the second 30-day survey mission conducted by the USNS Bruce Heezen and the Mozambican government. Two more are scheduled to take place in the coming months.

On the previous mission, two Mozambican oceanographers from the Ministry of Transportation and Communication were on board the ship and worked side by side with U.S. Naval Oceanographic Service scientists. Future missions will map more of Maputo Bay and will continue to develop the partnership between the U.S. and Mozambican governments.
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